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Authentic Sauna Blog

Lighting in a sauna

Lighting in a sauna… put some thought into this.  I have a few bright ideas that may help you.

dimmer: every sauna i’ve ever built has a light in it.  Every light is switched via a dimmer, just outside the sauna door on the changing room wall.  WHY? soft light is most preferred in a sauna.  the softer the better.  I like to nude up in a sauna and if i’m taking a sauna with guys, I don’t want the lighting to make me feel like i’m in a doctor’s office. get it?  A dimmer light allows for brighter light when reading in a sauna, and a brighter light is good when looking for a bottle opener or some product you lost under the bench.

candle: I have a good friend who has built saunas in remote areas, sans electricity.  Build your sauna with a window on the wall to the changing room (instead of a window in your sauna door).  The window sill in the changing room is a great spot to mount a candle holder.  The soft light from the candle casts a wonderful glow in your sauna room (and doesn’t melt the candle!).

window: a lot of hard core sauna nuts don’t like any light in their sauna, just a window facing the lapping shoreline on their pristine lake.  Who wouldn’t like that!!?  I have that gig at my lake sauna, and it’s priceless.  But indoor or an urban environment, a window to the changing room is the best gig.  Just imagine you’re at the lake!

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9 Comments on This Post

  1. Hi Glenn,

    Thanks so much for your ebook and posting all this info! I have a couple of questions about lighting. I just ran my electrical for switches and lights and put in 2 ceiling lights. There is one light in the vestibule and one in the sauna itself. I’m second-guessing myself about the ceiling lights and wondering if you have any thoughts. My first worry is that since it’s a wood fired sauna, the light fixture might be too close to the stovepipe (26″ away). Second, I worry that the plastic vapour barrier around the electrical box might actually melt. I’m using rockwool & foil vapour barrier on the ceiling and walls…but by habit put the thin plastic shells around the electrical boxes. Do you have any thoughts on this? Should I omit the plastic vapour barrier in the hot room? Would wall lights be a bit less of a hazard? Any suggestions would be much appreciated. Thanks!

  2. Plastic vapor barrier in the hot room is yesterday’s product. Foil bubble wrap, or foil wrap, is much better suited. It reflects heat back into the hot room, is easier to work with, and with good taping around the seams with foil tape, one need not worry about infultration or melting. My (26 year) experience. Hope this helps!

  3. Hi Glenn, thanks for your reply! Unfortunately I think you misunderstood my question. Yes I WILL be using foil on all the walls and ceiling. I’m wondering specifically how do you seal around the electrical boxes. Here’s a link to what I normally use (elsewhere in my home). Wondering if you can suggest an alternative? Or do you just let the sauna steam penetrate the insulation at the electrical switches and lights & hope things dry out? https://www.homedepot.ca/en/home/p.vapor-barrier-octogonal-box.1000176241.html

  4. don’t use those box vapor seals, they will likely melt. yes, there may be some vapor in the area around the box but not so much to be a concern. i would also recommend metal boxes in the hot room, especially if you like a real hot sauna (200+). the plastic light box in my sauna is deformed from melting. the wires are okay (or appear to be) but the box is toast. full disclosure, my light is at the ceiling elevation but pretty close to the heater (electric). so it probably gets more heat than if it was in a different corner but i still think it would melt either way.

  5. I know this is a very old post, but what’s the optimal electric light location? I’m getting ready to do electrical on an indoor sauna, about 5′ x 6′ size, where the door has to be on the short end and the benches will run the long way. Is one vapor-proof light enough? I’m thinking to put it on the wall with the door, above the lower bench, and close to the ceiling. Would you use a second light fixture, or would one be enough? FYI, I don’t have the option for a window.

  6. Hi Mike:

    Given that this is a new build, and that we build our saunas only once, my recommendation is as follows:
    1. LED rope light under upper bench.
    2. Wall sconce light on wall, adjacent to hot room door, 1′ from ceiling.

    IMPORTANT:
    Both lights are activated via dual switch box on wall outside of hot room, adjacent to door handle side of door. (easy access).

    REALLY IMPORTANT:
    Both lights are activated via dimmer switches.

    I’ve wired lights for sauna hot rooms every which way from Tuesday, and above is the optimal, greatest “ahhh”, not expensive, best, awesome-ist by a country mile.

    All fixtures can be procured at big box Depot store and are not expensive. 110v is the best. You can wire with a GFI outlet upstream and feed your sauna building with a simple extension cord or hard wire as desired.

    Great sauna lighting need not be fancy to be really versatile and wonderful and functional. Dim it down and chill! Crank it up and clean!

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